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NHL Ice Surface Poured at Little Caesars Arena

A major step in preparing for the Detroit Red Wings ice surface got underway today as crews made an all-day concrete pour on the event level of Little Caesars Arena.

Construction crews undertook the intricate process of encasing a system of ice-cooling steel pipes in concrete to keep the ice surface completely flat.

After being poured, the concrete will sit, untouched in a curing process, for 30 days. A standard NHL ice surface is 200 feet long and 85 feet wide—not until early summer will the first sheet of ice be poured on the new concrete floor.

Concrete was poured just six weeks after the start of excavation inside the arena. The state-of-the-art ice-cooling system will keep the surface extra cold during Detroit Red Wings games and serve as a base under hardwood floors for Detroit Pistons games.

Check out the progress at districtdetroit.com/webcams.

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The District Detroit is one of the largest sports and entertainment developments in the country. Located in the heart of Detroit, this 50-block, mixed-use development led by the Ilitch organization unites six world-class theaters, five neighborhoods and three professional sports venues in one vibrant, walkable destination for people who want to live, work and play in an exciting urban environment. Home to the Detroit Tigers, Detroit Red Wings, Detroit Pistons and Detroit Lions - The District Detroit represents the greatest density of professional sports teams in one downtown core in the country.

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Crews Ready Ice Surface at Little Caesars Arena

Work on the ice surface at Little Caesars Arena gets underway this week as crews have begun excavating dirt at the lowest part of the bowl to make way for ice-making infrastructure where the Detroit Red Wings will play beginning this fall. Detroit-based RBV Contracting is already moving heavy equipment into place to ready the area for crews to install piping and fixtures that will keep the surface extra cold.

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